Research interests

Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs, perovskites)

Organic and hybrid Solar Cells (OPV and hybrid perovskites)

Organic photodetectors (OPD)

Organic photodetectors (OPDs) are among the most promising families of this technology offering several advantages such as broadband spectral selectivity, low cost and low temperature production and solution processability. These unique properties lead to the development of a range of new products including portable fingerprint sensors, motion or object detectors, human machine interfaces, e-skin or systems for medical imaging.
We work on the optimization and reliability of visible OPD and on the conception of near infrared photodetectors with either small molecules or polymers.

Transistors (TFTs, OFETs, OECTs, air gap)

We develop organic field effect transistors on plastic substrates in order to integrate them in various devices. Solution processed oxide thin film transistors are also being developed with the aim of applying them to hybrid light emitting transistors. Another topic that we focus on is to use organic field effect transistors for the study of charge transport in bulk-heterojunction system.

Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (Polymer MEMS, Si MEMS)

We design and fabricate polymer MEMS from emerging printing technologies. Research interests focus on the integration of functional materials into these microsystems for (i) actuation (piezoelectric, electromagnetic) (ii) transduction (piezoresitive, piezoelectric, electrostrictive, transistive (OFET)) and (iii) functionalisation for bio-chemical detection (commercial polymers, carbon nanotube (CNT), molecular imprinted polymer (MIP). The current targeted applications are chemical detection in gaseous medium, chemical detection in liquid medium, characterization of the mechanical properties of materials (liquid and solid), cell mechanics, nondestructive testing and energy harvesting.

Elucidation of charge transport mechanisms in organic semiconductor devices

We use OLEDs, OPV, OPD, etc devices to elucidate the physical mechanisms that drive the optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductors. Combination of transient photovoltage (photocurrents), admittance spectroscopy, Mott-Schottky and steady state current voltage techniques as fonction of temperature are used to investigate the charge transport mechanisms in organic semiconductors